Sunday, February 3, 2013

DECAYING GRANDEUR

The colorful birthplace home of Tennessee Williams

Last week we had to go to Mississippi for a family funeral.  You can read about that here on my other blog.  




On the way to Starkville, I noticed a sign near the Columbus exit that said this was the "Tennessee Williams Birthplace" welcome center.  Since I was the one driving, as I usually am on road trips, I decreed that we would stop on the way home, and so we did.  (I drive because (1) I am a control freak and (2) my husband gets lost going around the block.)  We did not go in, as it did not appear to be open, but it was a dreary rainy day (this past Wednesday when there were nasty storms afoot).  


The house is very colorful, as was it's namesake.    Looking around the little town, I spied a number of other structures which caught my eye.  I did park a couple of times and take a few shots.  I thought you might enjoy them, too.  




There was a very old Episcopal church which caught my eye.






And then, this house.  Uninhabited it appeared, but look at the architectural details!  I wish I could get a house like this and restore every nook and cranny.




Two of these, one of either side of the gate.  They were chained up on the back legs....  look closely, bottom left.




Do quaint little towns intrigue you, too?  I don't think it is the town itself so much as it is the imagining of the lives that were lived in these old homes.   There must have been something going on here -- it produced Tennessee Williams.    So many Southern writers have come from Mississippi.  What do you think?

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I am linking to Susan for Metamorphosis Monday, the Texas ladies at Cowgirl UP and Nita for Mod Mix Monday.  For Wedensday, I am linking to Kim for Wow Us Wednesday.


12 comments:

  1. What a gorgeous old home..so sad to see it decaying...hope someone gets it and lovingly restores it! I love old towns and old homes too...my hubbie would never want the job of restoring an older home..so I'll just admire those that can!
    Miss Bloomers

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  2. Oh...gosh...I love that house! All the details are so pretty. I bet there are ghosts in that home and stories to be told.

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  3. I have always wanted to buy an older home and renovate it. However, my husband subscribes to the adage that, "the only things that work in in a old house are the people"!! He is probably right, but there is something so lovely about older homes. Thanks for sharing the photos. It is a shame that we live in a world, where people have to chain their belongings!

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  4. That 2nd house reminds me of the movie "Midnight in the Garden of Good & Evil" for some reason. LOVE IT!!! If I had the physical strength and the $$$ to restore historic old homes like those, I would jump on it in a heartbeat!!!

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  5. What a fabulous old home. I'd have that tree down in the front that hides the porch because the lines of the house are so pretty.When I ride through southern towns I love looking at the older homes.. the ones that could tell a story of the family who lived there. If you are ever in south Georgia, tour through Thomasville, Ga. The historic district has block after block of beautiful old homes and they are so well taken care of. The city takes much pride in them.

    There is a beautiful old two story home in the small town near where I live. The front palor housed the local telephone exchange in the forties and fifties. My friend lived there with her grandmother who was the owner of the little telephone company and the switch board operator. I was always so fascinated by it when I was there. Recently it was purchased by an out-of-town couple who have painted it bright peach and trimmed it in hunter green. Such an eye sore now but they won't have it forever. Maybe the next owners will improve it.

    conniebishop912@yahoo.com

    conniebishop912@yahoo.com

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  6. What a beautiful old home...it is sad when they are abandoned to the elements. I see so many old gems that are ready to fall in...I would take one over a new house any day of the week.

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  7. Hi Ellen,
    Glad you took photos. I love touring little towns like this and it seems they are far more interesting in the South too. The white house would be an enormous amount of work. More that I would be willing to do. You go right ahead and then we can all see your progress and visit via your blog when it's finished! Dianne

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  8. There are definitely some wonderful stories just waiting to be told in that little town, in those old houses. If walls could talk!
    I love the old homes and i often photograph them, too. Good post.

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  9. You just featured my home town! I never realized how beautiful it is until I left and came back
    for family visits. You might be interested in knowing that Mississippi State College for Women was
    the first state supported college for women in the nation. It is now co-ed and has another name, which I
    have forgotten. Most of the old homes on the south side have been renovated. There is a wonderful tour of greek revival homes in the spring.

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  10. I agree that these old towns are so intriguing! Wouldn't you have loved to have seen it in it prime?

    And I'd chain that bench too!

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  11. I do love the main streets of small southern towns --- there are always such gorgeous old homes.....what a dream to restore one...sigh. Thanks for your sweet visit.

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  12. What a fabulous second empire style house! I sure hope someone plans on preserving it. Thanks for the great tour-love places like this!

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